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with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
on that and say it's already here. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already
in science ever took it seriously. heresy number four, the concept of randomness is a mistake. there is far less randomness in this universe than today's science believes and far less randomness than you and i often think. this is not a six monkeys pecking out the works of shakespeare universe. far from it. and heresy number five, information theory -- the hot new theory of the last few years -- is not really about information. not at all. its equations cover only a tiny sliver of what the theory claims. the real core of information is what information theory's founder claude shannon called, quote, meaning, unquote. and meaning, believe it or not, is not covered in information theory. why is that a big mistake? because meaning is central to the cosmos. central to quirks, protons, foe tons, flax ris, stars, lobsters, puppies, bees and human beings. why bother with five heresies? because the cosmos herself is the real heretic. the real breaker of the manmade rules of reason. and thanks to her heretical bent, this we call or car -- peculiar rule-breaking cosmos that you and i have been watchin
as science in some louisiana schools. we'll bring you a story about people who are so primitive that you might just decide that maybe darwin was wrong. today is the birthday of kevin costner, maryland governor martin o'malley, and naacp head ben jealous and maryland i don't know barry was caught smoking crack on come are a and tragically never had a chance to make a self-serving half-truth confession on the own network. >> john: good evening, i'm john fugelsang. he cheated. he lied. he took the money. the rock star fame. and at least one other actual rock star, and reveled in the% praise of humanitarian and fillenphilanthropic works but today lance armstrong is just another fallen loser, the bottom line, lance, after insisting for years that you never ever, ever used performance-enhancing drugs in your cycling career, did you ever use any banned substances like testosterone cortisone or human growth hormone? >> yes. >> yes or no, in all seven of your tour de france victories did you ever take banned substances or blood dope? >> yes. >> in your opinion was it humanly possible to win the f
say well, maybe there's a problem with arrogance and science needs to be addressed. we would have better science and better scientists, and a better society if we could deal with that your and what are the structural reasons for it, and how might we mitigate that? that would be my question. i think some of that has already been addressed as a competitive nature. but the other would i want to throughout his height. -- hype. i think the human genome project is a wonderful example of something that was very important and very much overhyped. so we see that all the time. so that would be my challenge. sins are bad, and we all have them, and how do we mitigate them is what my question would be. >> i love the idea of a arrogance mitigation project. we can discuss how that might look on the ground, but, you know, as you are speaking, such -- given what stuart writes about certainty and uncertainty and ignorance in his book, and, i think taking it back to the hubris aspect, one of the deepest manifestations of arrogance is in the life statements of certainty, that something is exactly thi
speaks out for the first time. >>> it is the cutting edge science that turned a piece of skin into a beating heart on this amazing breakthrough that's changing medicine as we know it. >>> and man versus croc. the dangerous mission with what could be the largest crocodile on the planet, but who is the hunter, and who is the hunted? >> keep it right here, >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with bill wier. >> good evening. it is the sorted sex scandal that has turned a new england town upside down. an exercise instructor charged with using her latin themed workout studio for a prostitution ring whose detailed list of alleged clients name the names of over 100 local men. now her alleged business partner is feeling the heat, and tonight for the first time he speaks out to abc's john. >> reporter: this small picturesque new england town just a few miles from the summer compound of the first president bush is at the unlikely center of a white hot sex scandal. authorities claim this seemingly legitimate zumba dance studio, run by this woman, 30-year-old alexis wright, was act
time. >>> it is the cutting edge science that turned a piece of skin into a beating heart on this amazing breakthrough that's changing medicine as we know it. >>> and man versus croc. the dangerous mission with what could be the largest crocodile on the planet, but who is the hunter, and who is the hunted? >> keep it right here, america. i got this snapshot thing from progressive, plugged it intnto my car, and got a discount just for being the good driver i've always been. i'm ju out here, snap-shooting it forward. you don't want to have to pay for other people's bad driving, do you? no. with progressive snapshot, you don't have to. i'm going to snap itright. bam, there it is. goes underneath your dash. keep safe, and keep saving. you know, i won't always around to save you money. that's why you should get snapshot from progressive. all right, dude! thanks! to the safe go the savings. >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with bill wier. >> good evening. it is the sorted sex scandal that has turned a new england town upside down. an exercise instructor charged with u
have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted
. >>> and the right wingers and science don't mix. we're going to do the "politicsnation" science lab. you don't want to miss this. ♪ ♪music plays this vacation... has been a year in the planning. and here you are.. standing... nay... staring down your dreams. the rest of your holiday hinges on the moment you walk through that door. the door opens.. ...you hold your breath... and then you realize... you got it right! you got it booking right. because it doesn't get any better than this. it doesn't get any booking better than this. look at the view. look at the booking view. this is exactly what you booking needed. bask in the booking glory... at over a quarter million properties. planet earth's #1 accommodation site booking.com booking.yeah behind the silver of philadelphia cream cheese. it always begins with fresh, local milk, blended with real wholesome cream. going fresh from the farm, to our fridge, in just six days. because we believe in fresh taste. that's the way we set the standard for intensely rich, luscious flavor. so our story of fresh taste always ends... deliciously. when it comes t
. >> that is a pretty shot. thank you, lisa. also cutting edge science turns to toys. we will explain why researchers would build >> welcome back, everyone. it's 6:46 on this sunday, january 20ing. thank you for getting up and watching the abc7 sunday morning news. for your viewing pleasure, a shot from our east bay cam showing you emeryville looking across the bay to san francisco. a nice day on tap as we've had for the last several days. lisa argen says a change is on the way. she will be here to explain in just a few. >>> the cutting edge of science also involves ideas so complicated it's hard to wrap your mind around them. but one innovative program in the bay area is trying to make scientific research more efficient by making parts of it simpler. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> when most people see a stack of legos, you see this, and this guy sees building blocks of science. his campus used piles of them to construct their very own working lego microscope. >> the microscope essentially is made out of two lenses. the first one is here. >> they did need to
, cutting edge science turns to toys. we will explain why researchers would build a real microscope out of legos. [ male announcer ] pillsbury grands biscuits. delicious. but say i press a few out flat... add some beef sloppy joe sauce... and cheese fold it all up and boom! i just made an unbeatable unsloppy joe pillsbury grands biscuits. let the making begin. that's been wrapped in a flaky crust stuffed with a gooey center toasted up all golden brown then given a delicious design? a toaster strudel. pillsbury toaster strudel. so delicious...so fun. >> welcome back, it's 5:46. the temperatures in the bay area have been quite mild the last few days but apparently that's going to change, so says lisa argen, who will be coming up with her full accuweather forecast. >>> new this morning as 49ers fever builds and the team once again becomes one of the hottest franchise necessary the nfl, their new stadium in santa clara could open without a naming rights deal. today san francisco chronicle quotes team's spokesman bob lang as saying the team does not have anything in the pipeline yet. adding
varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
grade science class. what we've got is our standard little earth worm and i think the reason that this person got their video camera rolls washgs this earth worm seems to have translucent skin. in fact, it seems as though you can see blood circulating through its dorsal vessel. >> ooh. >> my goodness. >> this is very seventh grade science. i can smell that weird formaldehyde smell always in your science class. >> count you feel you're going to pin this worm down and start dissecting it? >> yeah, but you can see blood traveling back and forth? >> they do have blood. this is the dorsal vessel you're seeing and we're just watching the blood circulate. >> looks like little bolts of electricity going back and forth. >> it doesn't look real. >> it doesn't. >> shot by kim and so amazed by what he was seeing he thought, why not? >> looks like we're seeing an x-ray without x-ray goggles. >>> this video is so full of fail it's hard to keep track of them all. in brazil. we start with a jeep that swamped himself in the water. looks like he was trying to maybe run across the beach and wen
to many could. stem cell science. watching a man own heart tissue beat outside the body. what it means for all of us. plus the wife of man who hid out for more than two days to survive the hostage crisis in algeria speaks in and out exclusive interview with abc news. >> and insanity defense is not unique but this is sure different. man charmed with the murder of 3 co-workers pwlaiments on his childhood in pwlaiments on his childhood in china. get well, well, well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. >> good evening again. we begin this half hour with new video out of algeria showing hostages huddled together held cabtive by -- captive held by al qaeda more americans than we previously knew h
decline in three years. in fact, the number of deals were also down 6%. clean technology and life sciences were among the hardest hit sectors. >> what's behind this decline, and what does it mean forthcoming year? is it a big worry as america tries to lead in innovation? joining us brad weinberg of blueprint health, here with us at the new york stock exchange, an accelerator that funds primarily health i.t. startups, and john baackes is also with us of new atlantic ventures which invests mostly in mobile technology and e-commerce. john, we'll start with you. how much of this decline had to do with concerns of the fiscal cliff at the end of last year? what do you think? >> the decline, bill, if you take a look at it, was completely represented in the clean tech sector and the life sciences sector. the sectors we invest in are software and internet. this was the best year, 2012, for software investments since 2001. it was the second best year for internet investments since 2001. so the total picture might look grim, but in the space of technology. software and internet, it's a good story. >>
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. now what? "special report" at 6:00. now back to "the five." ♪ ♪ >> dana: two topics to get to on "the five." last week we told you about a reality tv show. that featured atlanta wrapper. the claim to fame is fathering 19 children with ten different moms. what is his name? >> eric: shoddy. >> to you he might be known as rapper but in atlanta he is known for having 11 kids and ten babies' mommas. >> they say i'm the first lady. i am the baby's momma. >> you better listen. >> oxygen network decided to pull the plug on it after uproar. why are you laughing? >> i'm heart broken. >> greg: i was thinking of being the baby's momma. >> dana: anyway, there is public pressure. do you think it was pressuring oxygen the take it off the air? >> eric: we did the segment, train wreck tv says it makes money but it's color blind, we pointed out honey boo-boo. nothing to do with race. freddie i think with "buck wild" you make fun of rednecks. >> dana: do you
a question posed earlier. >> why >> cutting edge of science often involves ideas that you can't can't wrap your mind around them. >> where people see legos this researcher sees a building block of science, his team at university mission bay campus used piles of them to construct their own working lego microscopes. >> it is two lenses. first one is objective. it's here. >> he says they did need special parts in the 3 d printer. a kind of computerized easy bake oven that can make useful items. >> the results? a working device built to answer questions. except one you may be asking now. why build a microscope out of legos? answer is a new program that is designed to change the way scientists think about their work. the director says one goal is to make projects more practical. >> and having work together. in way of brin storming them. it's bringing new dimension to the way it can be done. >> the team was tasked with reimaging uses for a scope development at the university of california. createors envisioned it was as a way of diagnosing diseases but it has yet to be commercialized. scott patt
alameda creek filter gallery project, with environmental science associates to provide environmental analysis services and permitting support; and authorize the general manager to execute this amendment with a time extension of six years, for a total agreement of duration of eight years, 10 months. >> [speaker not understood]. good afternoon, commissioners. tm kelly. this project, the alameda creek, per alameda creek filter gallery project is located in [speaker not understood] on alameda creek. it is to recapture water that is released for fisheries, habitat enhancement from the calaveras dam. the project started in january 2010, then it was placed on hold for -- since november 2011, basically two years. and now we are ready, almost ready. the planning has been going on to plan the project and we're almost ready to start environmental review again, but we don't have enough time. so, therefore, we're asking for a three-year, five-month extension. there was a slight error in the agenda item under amendment number 1. if you look at that, it says extension by sick years. >> yes. >> but
or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
's set to hit the market in the next few weeks. the ceo of protein sciences joins us with a look at the new drug and what it could mean for the company as it now looks to go public. david: 2012 was a massive year for the markets with the s&p posting its largest gain in three years. will it continue? what's the best play to play it? >> here with a first on fox business look at the firm's 2013 outlook is chad morganlander portfolio manager at stifel nicolaus. thanks for coming on. >> thank you for having me. >> all right, so break it down for us here. what does 2013 look like? what's your outlook? >> well, it is going to look similar to 2012 for the united states for the first quarter or two and then you should see a reacceleration in 2013. capital spending in the united states should improve, household credit growth, home prices are going to start getting a lift, home sales which will be a self-sustaining recovery, something that you haven't seen for several years. david: but after-tax income is going down, is it not? >> well, it will, but historically the consumer has the ability
annual conference on science, policy, and the environment, disasters in the environment. i'm the executive director of a national council of the science of the environment, and it is my distinct master of ceremonies for much of the conference. thank you for coming. lots of people are still outside, encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with co
to the science, an extreme weather event, including hurricane sandy defend stating drought, should inspire us all to think about how we do this job better. providing relief to devastated families and communities is of course the first action. i support it. it should be national priority and i support hr152 as well as the rogers amendment. but we cannot afford to continue the status quo. we need to assure that the investment is done wisely and that it minimizes exposure in the future. first, we need to invest in mitigation. investing a dollar in mitigation can save five dollars in long-term expenses. we need to change the way we budget for disasters. massive storms are no longer unforeseen. we got to get out of the mindset where we toss in a billion dollars in the appropriations committee because it's cheaper for the appropriations committee to fund billions of dollars of unforeseen expenses after the fact, than a few hundred million dollars to prevent those disasters in the long run. and finally, could i not agree more with the testimony that i heard, sitting here, that we need to make sure we're
award. during school time i like learning math and science, because my teacher uses chinese to explain. if the teachers didn't teach my cousins and my sisters and me how to speak chinese, we wouldn't be able to speak in restaurants. once again, thank you. [applause] [speaking foreign language] >> good evening, everyone, i am winnie chi, i am the body president of alice fong yu, this is like a second home to me. the teachers and my friends support me and they make me feel special. and also staff members and teachers guarantee that we have a safe environment to learn. and they make us feel comfortable and safe to share our feelings. i enjoy math and science, because the teachers teach us in chinese. and they teach us step by step. i am proud to be a student at alice fong yu. thank you. [speaking foreign language] [applause] >> hello, everyone, i am maze. i a seventh grader at alice fong yu, and i am peer mediator. afy is an amazing school. the chinese i learned there has been helpful in so many situations. if not for me being able to speak chinese, i would not be able to communicate with
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
's not on the rise and neither is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general cam
. apologies to matt damon, we ran out of time. tomorrow night, mark wahlberg, jennifer lopez and science bob. thanks for watching. stay up for "nightline." good night. >>> tonight on "nightline," she's charged with shooting, stabbing, and slashing her one-time boyfriend. tonight, the explosive recordings exposing her changing story and her web of lies. >>> hot, sweaty, and under fire. he claims he can help you live longer and improve your sex life. the millionaire guru and the accusation shaking his hot yoga empire. >>> secret brazil. we journeyed to the hidden corners of south america for close encounters with nature's noble and not so noble beasts. >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with cynthia mcfadden. >> good evening, and thanks for joining us. tonight, we begin with a shocking story of love gone deadly wrong. the latest twist in the murder trial of 32-year-old woman charged with shooting, stabbing, and slashing her one-time boyfriend. well, she's admitted to police that she did indeed kill him. she's claiming it was self-defense. but today, explosive new tapes reminded the ju
statewide. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is live in san jose where officials warn that this potentially deadly flu season is only getting started. john? >> reporter: that's right. tonight i have been seeing more and more people coughing and keeping their distance. officials say one death, there could be many more. >> typical peak of flu a month away the first flu death. >> a 98-year-old woman that had chronic illnesses. >> reporter: he said she died a week ago. althoughthe state does not report deaths in those over 65. we found a myth keeping some from getting the flu shot. >> i am scared. it gets me sick. >> reporter: but they are swamped with demand and out of flu vaccine. i checked this walgreen's. they had 100 doses right now but would ship what is left tomorrow to other stores that have run out. it is procrastinators and people seeing a bad flu season back east. >> this is not the typical time but that is what we are seeing. >> reporter: the county will offer two flu shot clinics here in san jose. some doctors and the medical center also have vaccine. this dea
live." >> kids teachers and me the difference between boys and girls and science brought some reverse helium balloons that do this. luke, i am your father. >> is that for real? >> i don't know. it is funny. >> "jimmy kimmle live" is >>> if you are hoping to be decked out in 49er apparel for sunday's big game and you don't have any yet, you better get on it. there is a run on all things niners. we caught up with the team as they were leaving for atlanta today. ama dates is live for us in the south bay. ama? >> yes, carolyn. 49ers fever has swept the bay area. somebody walked behind me and said woo-hoo, kaepernick. while the team is in atlanta, the fans are with them in spirit. as the 49ers prepare to take on the falcons in atlanta, fans at the sports authority are buying up the team apparel. >> i got lucky with the kaepernick jersey i got that was the right size and it was the last one. >> he needed to wear it to the house party he is going to with friends. others will catch the game in places like pedro's tavern in san pedro. >> we have been getting calls sunday and even sunday evenin
and make new averages and they have been trending. i think that is new normal. >> the science at many weather conferences i have attended provided proof and the glaciers and charts of the temperatures rising, not just in one location around the country. i think certainly global warming is a huge threat to the bay area. if it continues at current pace we could be seeing major climate changes. we're seeing changes around the country and around the world. >> i have to say one of the best tools we have is live doppler 7-hd. >> leigh glaser, "abc 7 news" meteorologist. >> when i am out in the field reporting on weather, it is spot on. it is so reliable, it's accurate live doppler 7. >> it's on mount st. helena. it is farther west than any other bay area radar. >> with radarn ands location and location, like real estate having ours in the north and farther to the west is going to help us sees comin storms cominn or coming in from the west. we will be able to see them quicker. >> logan johnson, national weather service. >> ours is located near san jose so it doesn't cover the north bay so we
promised action on climate change. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler joins us now live in foster city with reaction and the reality. john? >> reporter: indeed it is beautiful here tonight at center park but experts tell me do nothing and today's children will inherit a changed world. >> reporter: foster city could be at the bottom of the bay as seas rise from climate change, water, food and civilization disrupted. >> we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing the failure to do so would betray our children. >> reporter: he devoted a minute to climate change. it was more than in the reelection campaign so it was a welcome surprise. >> reporter: he notes climate and energy reform failed three years ago when democrats controlled congress. >> it is hard to imagine this congress really approving aggressive legislation on the climate issue. >> people notice global changes and controlling carbon emissions are so important citizens should speak up. >> voice opinion so our congressmen will push for it. >> if everybody does a little bit it could be done. i am not sure you could
co-author who is professor of political science at harvard. many years ago when we repose at princeton university, we co-taught a course at the public policy and that led to his co-authored several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, you get to vegetative examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you work, walk us through this. >> guest: this is a tale of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, bu
want to wear your lunch. on your sleeve. [ laughter ] and don't think science is gonna come to the rescue. >> british researchers have created a projectile vomitting robot that mimics the symptoms of norovirus. resereachers created the projectile robot to test how far the dangerous contagion spreads everytime someone throws up. >> stephen: because if you want to study vomit spray patterns, you have two options: build a robot that pukes, or ride the subway after 2:00 am. [ laughter ] which brings me threat number 3: vomiting robots. [ laughter ] really, science? you know we haven't cured cancer yet, right? [ laughter ] you might want to put some of this energy into that. because once our robots are womiting, who's going to clean up after my roomba? [ laughter ] my other roomba? it'll start puking when it sees the first one blow chunks. [ laughter ] on the plus side, we finally have a robot the japanese won't want to have sex with. [ laughter ] but they should, because... >> new strains of drug restistant gonorrhea have spread to countries around the world. >> gonorrhea is beg
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
akin. [laughter] a member of the house committee on science, space and technology. it's true. he's the kind of science committee. then there was the theory that romney was a very good candidate , didn't say things people understood, didn't connect with people very well and was somewhat awkward. for instance, when he went to michigan, his home state for that primary and said the trees for the raid had been michigan. the actual quote was i love this state. it seems right here. the trees at the right height. away from here i find no trees to please. no trees at such a perfect height as these. for me i cannot ever be at ease to grow one's knees. or two tall trees that splinter group wisconsin sure has bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where they take your skis. connecticut of course has lyme disease. [laughter] and none of these semi-prepared to say is currently here with the perfect perfect height of trees. [applause] and according to that theory, romney just was in a very good candidate. they should have nominated somebody else. and there is also a theory they were demograp
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
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